ASSIGNMENT

Plan and (hypothetically) evaluate a public health intervention utilizing the MAP-IT Tool.

Based upon the key findings, gaps, and recommendations obtained from the family assessment and the community assessment perform an evaluation of an actual or hypothetical public health intervention. The intervention MUST address one of the Healthy People Topics & Objectives

No two public health interventions are exactly alike. But most interventions share a similar path to success: Mobilize, Assess, Plan, Implement, Track.

Otherwise known as MAP-IT, this framework can be used to plan and evaluate public health interventions to achieve Healthy People 2020 objectives. Whether you are a seasoned public health professional or new to the field, the MAP-IT framework will help you create your own path to a healthy community and a healthier Nation.

MOBLIZE –

Questions To Ask and Answer: What is the vision and mission of the coalition? Why do I want to bring people together?

Who should be represented?

Who are the potential partners (organizations and businesses) in my

community? Assess both needs and assets (resources) in your community.

This will help you get a sense of what you can do, versus what you would like

to do. Work together as a coalition to set priorities.

What do community members and key stakeholders see as the most important issues? Consider feasibility, effectiveness, and measurability as you determine your priorities. Start collecting State and local data to paint a realistic picture of community needs.

The data you collect during the assessment phase will serve as baseline data. Baseline data provide information you gather before you start a program or intervention. They allow you to track your progress.

CRITICAL ELEMENTS –

1. Key individuals and organizations are identified to address the community need

2. Appropriate community coalitions already in place are asked to join the MAP-IT project 3. Vision for the community defined and stated

ASSESS –

Questions To Ask and Answer:

Who is affected and how?

What resources do we have?

What resources do we need?

Assess both needs and assets (resources) in your community.

This will help you get a sense of what you can do, versus what you would like to do. Work together as a coalition to set priorities.

What do community members and key stakeholders see as the most important issues? Consider feasibility, effectiveness, and measurability as you determine your priorities.

Start collecting State and local data to paint a realistic picture of community needs.

The data you collect during the assessment phase will serve as baseline data. Baseline data provide information you gather before you start a program or intervention. They allow you to track your progress.

CRITICAL ELEMENTS –

4. Community assessment includes all required demographic data 5. Assessment includes all required morbidity and mortality data

6. Three behavioral risk factors that are modifiable are identified the community

7. Community needs and strengths listed, including available resources and needed resources 8. Capacity of healthcare system defined

PLAN –

Questions To Ask and Answer:

What is our goal?

What do we need to do to reach our goal? Who will do it? How

will we know when we have reached our goal?

A good plan includes clear objectives and concrete steps to achieve them.

The objectives you set will be specific to your issue or community; they do not have to be exactly

the same as the ones in Healthy People 2020.

Consider your intervention points

Where can you create change?

Think about how you will measure your progress. How

will you know if you are successful?

When setting objectives, remember to state exactly what is to be achieved.

What is expected to change, by how much, and by when? Make your objectives challenging, yet realistic.

Remember: Objectives need a target. A target is the desired amount of change (reflected by a number or percentage). A target needs a baseline (where you are now—your first data point).

CRITICAL ELEMENTS –

9. Goal is clearly defined.

10. Strategies to meet goal are realistic and measureable. 11. Evaluation method is clearly stated.

IMPLEMENT –

Questions To Ask and Answer:

Are we following our plan?

What can we do better?

First, create a detailed work plan that lays out concrete action steps, identifies who is responsible for completing them, and sets a timeline and/or deadlines.

Make sure all partners are on board with the work plan.

Next, consider identifying a single point of contact to manage the process and ensure that things get done. Be sure to share responsibilities across coalition members. Do not forget to periodically: Bring in

new partners for a boost of energy and fresh ideas.

Check in with existing partners often to see if they have suggestions or concerns. Get the

word out: develop a communication plan.

Convene kick-off events, activities, and community meetings to showcase your accomplishments (and partners).

CRITICAL ELEMENTS –

12. Action plan is in the active tense and gives specific tasks to be done to accomplish the program plan/intervention

13. Monitoring plan tracks incremental progress of the action plan (what, how, how often, by whom)

TRACK –

Questions To Ask and Answer: Are we evaluating our work? Did we follow the plan?

What did we change?

Did we reach our goal?

Plan regular evaluations to measure and track your progress over time.

Consider partnering with a local university or State center for health statistics to help with data tracking. Some things to think about when you are evaluating data over time:

Data Quality: Be sure to check for standardization of data collection, analysis, and structure of questions.

Limitations of Self-Reported Data: When you are relying on self-reported data (such as exercise frequency or income), be aware of self-reporting bias.

Data Validity and Reliability: Watch out for revisions of survey questions and/or the development of new data collection systems. This could affect the validity of your responses over time. (Enlist a statistician to help with validity and reliability testing.)

Data Availability: Data collection efforts are not always performed on a regular basis.

Do not forget to share your progress—and successes—with your community. If you see a positive trend in data, issue a press release or announcement.

CRITICAL ELEMENTS –

14. Evaluation plan in place detailing what data will be collected

15. Detailed data collection tools included

16. Data analysis includes progress made, lessons learned, reporting results back to the community 17.Program/project addresses one of the Health People 2020 Topics & Objectives

For emphasis -Each section has CRITICAL ELEMENTS, which must be clearly addressed

Be sure to include a conclusion – Are the needs of the family you assessed being adequately met at the community level; which ultimately serves the needs of the population … the focus of community health nursing.

APA 6th edition format is to be used for this presentation – meaning your title slide should include the title, your name, and the course. All material must have APA formatted citations. Make sure you have an introduction, body, and summary/conclusion to your presentation.

assignment

My Scholarly paper topic: Current Political Issues in Diverse Cultural Groups

 

Please be sure to use APA format, New Times Roman 12 font, correct grammar, no passive verb (examples “to be”, “been determined”) it needs correct (subject, verb, object). Follow and address Rubric below, use only references less than 5 years, and at least 3 or more. This is a major paper that should be 8-10 pages.   

 

Be sure to discuss states that took Medicaid expansion compared to those that don’t have it and SC was one of the states that don’t have it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Health Policy Scholarly Paper – this is a major paper that should be 8-10 pages, written in APA format with a minimum of 3 or more references. 

  94-100

Described Excellently! No APA or Grammar Issues

87-93

Describes well:
More than 2 APA/Grammar Issues

80-86
Noted:

More than 2 APA/Grammar Issues

73-79
Referred to:

More than 3APA/Grammar Issues

72-0

Not addressed. More than 4 APA/Grammar Issues

Abstract          
Introduction          
Background          
Issues          
Proposed solutions and effects          
Leadership needed to promote change          
Collaboration needed with other professionals          
APRN or MBA or PA Implications          
References          

 

*No references older than five years. Late Submissions: Minus 10 points/day.