Writing process2 | English homework help

Objectives

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Use prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing to write

 

formal, college-level essays

 

Distinguish between different patterns of development

 

Apply an appropriate pattern of development to a specific

 

purpose and audience

 

Develop paragraphs using topic sentences, adequate

 

detail, supporting evidence, and transitions

 

Apply the conventions of standard written American

 

English to produce correct, well-written essay

Topic

Balancing Penn Foster studies with work, family, and other

activities and responsibilities

Drafting Your Essay

This assignment requires two paragraphs. Each paragraph

employs a pattern of development that was covered in the

reading for this lesson. If you’re not familiar with narration,

description, or process analysis, you should review the

required reading for Lesson 4.

For your first paragraph, use the narrative and description

techniques you learned in this lesson to describe daily activi-

ties. You’ll write about the activities you dedicate your time

to: schoolwork, family responsibilities, and your job. Don’t

forget to include other pursuits such as hobbies, sports, and

volunteer and social activities. Since this is your prewriting,

write as much as you can, up to 500 word

In your second paragraph, focus on how you manage your

 

time to accomplish everything you need and want to. For this

 

paragraph, use process analysis to explain how you manage

 

your time. Consider the tools you employ such as a planner or

 

calendar, whether paper or electronic, or even a chart or list.

 

Again, write as much as you want, up to 500 words, to clearly

 

illustrate your process for managing your busy schedule.

 

This is an example of what the

 

description

 

portion might

 

look like:

 

My name is Jean. I am in my mid-forties, and I would

 

never have expected that I would one day have so many

 

different hats to wear. My husband thought it was a great

 

idea; he knew that I always wanted to be a real nurse and

 

that if we hadn’t gotten married so young and I hadn’t put

 

him through school that I would have been one. He was

 

so encouraging about it in the beginning. The boys

 

thought it was cool too; they both said it was going to be

 

fun to have to nag me to do my homework for a change.

 

So finally, with my family’s blessing, I decided to go back

 

to school to get a degree in nursing. When I made the

 

decision, everyone in my family agreed to do their part to

 

make sure I would have time to study and get through the

 

exams successfully. But now, a few months into school,

 

when I come home from my full-time job as a nurse’s aide

 

and take off that hat, it seems as though my day has

 

barely started. With two teenage children living at home, I

 

must put on my mother’s hat and enforce household

 

rules, dispense of advice, help with homework, and occa-

 

sionally provide a shoulder to cry on. Before my husband

 

comes home from his job, I have to pop on my chef’s hat

 

and get dinner started; the maid’s hat will come out later

 

when I do the family’s laundry and clean the bathrooms.

 

As if all this weren’t enough, the responsibility has also

 

fallen to me for looking after my aging mother, thanks to

 

my sister who can’t even look after herself. Two or three

 

evenings a week I slip on my daughter’s hat and make the

 

trip across town to my mother’s house, where I spend an

 

hour or so paying bills, restocking the cupboards, and

 

helping with other household chores. At least all I have to

 

do is light dusting, sitting at the table, and listening to

 

her talk about her television programs. In between all o

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lesson 4

Read the assignment in this study guide. Then read Chapter 14,

“Process Analysis.” To gauge your progress, complete the self-

In the world of employment, you’ll find that the techniques of

are vital to achievement and success. For

example, if you’re an administrative assistant, a salesperson,

or a carpenter, you’ll receive instructions in some form that

tell you what to do and how to do it, whether in a memo, in

person, or in a blueprint. If you’re an office manager, a sales

manager, or a job foreman, you’ll be giving instructions to

others. To properly explain a job or understand what needs

to be done and in what order, you must understand process

There are two basic forms of process analysis.

is intended for people who may need guidelines for doing

something or learning something. Instructions for using an

appliance, step-by-step guidelines for responding to an emer-

gency, or tips for taking stains out of clothing illustrate this

kind of process analysis.

Informative process analyses

explain how things work or how

they’re done for people who might like to know, even if they

don’t need that information in their everyday lives. A process

explanation of a surgical technique or an anthropologist’s

account of how Cheyenne youth prepare for a vision quest

are examples of this kind of process analysis.

First, read through the “Quick Start” exercise on pages 336–337

and think about how you would complete the exercise.

Read “What Is Process Analysis?” Then,

read the essay “How to Interview” provided by Monster.com.

It’s an example of process analysis of the “how-to” variety.

Under “Characteristics of Process Analysis,” on pages 342–344,

study the guidelines for writing a process analysis. Notice

 

English Composition

that when a thesis statement is included in a process analy-

sis, it’s typically devoted to explaining how the process is

valuable, whether it’s a weight-loss diet, an exercise regimen,

or an approach to money management. It’s important to

present the steps or stages in chronological order, define

technical terms, provide detail, and warn of possible trouble

Because your first writing assignment is a process analysis

essay, study each part of this chapter very carefully.

After spending some quality time studying

the characteristics of process analysis essays, read the essay

“Inside the Engine,” by Tom and Ray Magliozzi, formerly of

“Car Talk” radio. You’ll find lots of practical “how-to” tips on

auto maintenance presented in the engaging, often amusing

conversational style for which the “car guys” are famous.

The essay is followed by a graphic organizer (Figure 14.2 on

page 349). Study it. Then study the section on integrating

process analysis into an essay.

Here’s your guided writing assignment for

this chapter. You can choose one of the suggested topics or

pick one of your own. But in either case, you’ll want to make

sure you truly understand what it takes to write a process

An essay by Eric Michalski is featured in

the “Students Write” section for this chapter. It’s all about

how to make chili for a crowd. As you have before, take

advantage of the essay’s autopsy. Note the chronological

sequence of steps. Admire the author’s figures of speech.

Read about working with text while reading

a process analysis essay. Then read “Dater’s Remorse,” by

Cindy Chupack. Ms. Chupack is a writer who became the

executive producer of “Sex and the City.” That fact may give

you a hint as to the author’s angle on the precarious game of

dating while in search of an ideal relationship. Enjoy the

writer’s engaging and amusing style. Think about your own

relationships as you decide if the author’s points ring true.

To explore how process analysis may be

combined with other patterns of development, read Anne

Lamott’s piece, “Shitty First Drafts.” You may well benefit

from the author’s ideas about how a ragged and wretched

 

Lesson 4

first draft may become a springboard to a “not bad” second

draft and even, in the end, an essay that captures and nails

a thesis in all the right ways.

Required Journal Entry 8: Description and Narration

Using the details you collected in Journal Entry 7, write the story to accompany the

photo. Be sure that your story has a clear beginning, middle, and end, and that you use your dia-

logue and descriptive elements effectively to convey your feelings to your reader. (3 paragraphs,

Does your photo tell an audience everything they would need to know about this event?

What does your story provide that your picture can’t? Is the saying, “A picture is worth a thou-

sand words” true? (Length open)

1. Exercise 14.1, on page 343: Draft a working thesis statement for one of the five topics and a

chronological list of the steps or stages of the process.

2. Exercise 14.2, on page 344: List technical terms and definitions for one the three

3. Read or reread the essay “Dater’s Remorse” on pages 364–366. On page 366, under

“Examining the Reading,” respond to all four items.

4. Read or review the essay, “Shitty First Drafts” on pages 367–369. On page 370, under

“Examining the Reading,” respond to all five items.

Check your answers with those in the online Self-Check Answers supplement.

 

 

 

Use prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing to write

formal, college-level essays

 

Distinguish between different patterns of development

 

Apply an appropriate pattern of development to a specific

 

Develop paragraphs using topic sentences, adequate

detail, supporting evidence, and transitions

 

Apply the conventions of standard written American

English to produce correct, well-written essays

Balancing Penn Foster studies with work, family, and other

activities and responsibilities

This assignment requires two paragraphs. Each paragraph

employs a pattern of development that was covered in the

reading for this lesson. If you’re not familiar with narration,

description, or process analysis, you should review the

required reading for Lesson 4.

For your first paragraph, use the narrative and description

techniques you learned in this lesson to describe daily activi-

ties. You’ll write about the activities you dedicate your time

to: schoolwork, family responsibilities, and your job. Don’t

forget to include other pursuits such as hobbies, sports, and

volunteer and social activities. Since this is your prewriting,

write as much as you can, up to 500 words.

Prewriting—Process Analysis

 

In your second paragraph, focus on how you manage your

time to accomplish everything you need and want to. For this

paragraph, use process analysis to explain how you manage

your time. Consider the tools you employ such as a planner or

calendar, whether paper or electronic, or even a chart or list.

Again, write as much as you want, up to 500 words, to clearly

illustrate your process for managing your busy schedule.

This is an example of what the

My name is Jean. I am in my mid-forties, and I would

never have expected that I would one day have so many

different hats to wear. My husband thought it was a great

idea; he knew that I always wanted to be a real nurse and

that if we hadn’t gotten married so young and I hadn’t put

him through school that I would have been one. He was

so encouraging about it in the beginning. The boys

thought it was cool too; they both said it was going to be

fun to have to nag me to do my homework for a change.

So finally, with my family’s blessing, I decided to go back

to school to get a degree in nursing. When I made the

decision, everyone in my family agreed to do their part to

make sure I would have time to study and get through the

exams successfully. But now, a few months into school,

when I come home from my full-time job as a nurse’s aide

and take off that hat, it seems as though my day has

barely started. With two teenage children living at home, I

must put on my mother’s hat and enforce household

rules, dispense of advice, help with homework, and occa-

sionally provide a shoulder to cry on. Before my husband

comes home from his job, I have to pop on my chef’s hat

and get dinner started; the maid’s hat will come out later

when I do the family’s laundry and clean the bathrooms.

As if all this weren’t enough, the responsibility has also

fallen to me for looking after my aging mother, thanks to

my sister who can’t even look after herself. Two or three

evenings a week I slip on my daughter’s hat and make the

trip across town to my mother’s house, where I spend an

hour or so paying bills, restocking the cupboards, and

helping with other household chores. At least all I have to

do is light dusting, sitting at the table, and listening to

her talk about her television programs. In between all of

 

Examination, Lesson 4

these other pressures on my time, I need to study and

take a test because I got an email and need to attend

another webinar! Sometimes I really don’t know where I

am going to find the time, energy, or money to do all of

this, and I wonder once again if this is really worth it.

When I finally get some time around 11:30 at night, I dis-

cover that the dog has chewed through my study guide.

Okay, I take a breath because I think I can remember

most of the material, and I log onto the website to take

the test. However, when I do I discover that my son has

gotten onto my account and taken the exam. Of course he

failed! The next day when I call the school, no one there

believes me at first, and then I get advice not to leave my

passwords out and that I can retake the exam in 48

hours. My frustration level has hit a new high! Once again

I am wondering why I am putting myself through all this.

Here’s an example of what the process portion might look like:

After the first time that rotten dog chewed one of my

study guides and my 13-year-old son took one of my

exams because he wished to be helpful, I realized I needed

a better strategy to accomplish this whole school thing. I

mean, I am organized at work. After all, I need to be

because I am a nurse’s aide and I can’t mess up people’s

charts or else I would get fired. I must be organized in

paying my mother’s bills and taking care of my home

finances, or else the bill collectors will come after me. I

make decent meals and make thought-out grocery lists for

both houses because I only want to go to the store once a

week and don’t want to track back and forth through the

aisles and buy impulse items like I know they want me to.

However, I need to get a plan in place to make this work

because this is important to me. First, I call a family

meeting and remind them about the conversation we had

and all the promises they made before I started school.

Next, I decide to change my password and not leave it

lying around so that my son won’t get at it when he

thinks he is trying to help. Then, I get all my books and

put them in one place on a shelf next to the dining room

table. I cannot have my own room because we can’t afford

another computer, but now everyone knows this is my

stuff and no one is supposed to touch it. I made that fac

clear after I yelled at them during my tirade over the

destroyed book and exam my son took. Next, I ask my

husband if he could help with the cooking or would mind

pizza one night a week so I would have more time to

study. Then, I teach my oldest son how to run the washer

and dryer; after all he is almost 16, and if he thinks I am

going to follow him to college and do his laundry he has

another thought coming! I cannot do anything about the

time I devote to my mom, and I will not begrudge her that.

However, my sister can help a bit more and has agreed to

at least do the shopping and spend one night a week with

her; I’ll still pay the bills because my sister can’t manage

her own finances. Honestly, now that I have a plan and

everyone has agreed to help out more, I don’t feel so

stressed and have a bit more time to study, so I feel better

and think I can accomplish this.

SUBMITTING THE ASSIGNMENT

To submit the assignment, follow these steps:

3. Go to your Student Portal.

5. Find the section for this project, and click on the

where you’ve saved your work in your computer. The

writing should have been saved under

number_exam number_last name_first name.

number for this assignment is

Essays must be typed, double-spaced, using a standard 12-point font and left justification. Use

1-inch margins at the top and bottom and 1.25-inch margins for the left and right sides of the

document. Each page must have a properly formatted header containing your name, student

number, exam number, page number, mailing address, and email address (see page 6 for an

example). Name each document using your student number first, then the six-digit lesson num-

ber, and finally your last name (for example, 23456789_050177 Doe). Save each as “File Type:

Rich Text Format,” regardless of your word-processing program.

 

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