PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING (REPORT) Students Name: Adesoji Majekodunmi

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING(REPORT)Students Name: Adesoji MajekodunmiStudents ID: 42448Module Leader: Anthony AttahModule Code: A006CONTENTSIntroduction …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3Definition of PDP …………………………………………………………………………………………. . 3Importance of Communication Skill ………………………………………………………………3Definitions and features of listening and interpersonal skills ……………………. . 3Self- awareness …………………………………………………………………………………………. 3Effective listening ………………………………………………………………………………………. 4Helping or facilitating ………………………………………………………………………………. . . 4Reflecting …………………………………………………………………………………………………. . 4Assertiveness ……………………………………………………………………………………………. . 4Non- verbal communication ………………………………………………………………………. 4Importance of Group Work …………………………………………………………………………. . 4Advantages…………………………………………………………………………………………………5Disadvantages ……………………………………………………………………………………………5Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………………………………………5Bibliography …………………………………………………………………………………………………7REPORT ON PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNINGIntroduction:In this report, the significance of Personal DevelopmentPlanning (PDP) would be discussed and analyse the importanceof computer literacy, communication skills and group work, andreflecting how students can benefit from PDP and makeendorsements. Definition of PDP:Personal Development Planning (PDP) is a structured andsupported process undertaken by an individual to reflect upontheir own learning, performance or achievement and to plan fortheir personal, educational and career development (QAA,2009a, p. 2). PDP at GSM is an inclusive process, open to all learners at alllevels. Effective PDP improves the capacity of individuals toreview, plan and take responsibility for their learning and tounderstand what they learn and how they learn it (QAA, 2009a,p. 2). Engaging in the process of PDP helps learners to articulatetheir learning and achievement more explicitly and supportslearning as a lifelong and life wide activity (QAA, 2009a). Importance of Computer Literacy:Students, educators and employers differ in their perspectiveswhen it comes to computer literacy. A teacher may feelstudents are computer literate if they can use a computerapplication to complete an assignment without additionaltutoring or hand- holding. Employers want productive, highlymotivated computer- savvy employees who can make thingshappen. Every time an employer has to resort to additionaltraining for an unskilled employee, it costs the employer timeand money. The younger generation of students has a universal view ofcomputer literacy, they want to know how to use the computerfor activities that are important to them. Teachers have animmediate view of computer literacy often referred to ascomputer competency. Teachers just want students to besuccessful solving computer- based problems without anyadditional work on the teacher’s part. According to Tanyel et al,(1999) shows that faculty and employers do not always agreeupon the same definition of computer literacy. An employerwants workers who are competent in industry specific computerapplications, who can easily learn new computer skills, and whocan adapt to new situations. Employers value computingfluency and expertise. In reality, each of these viewpoints isvalid if one views computer literacy as a continuum: beginningwith computing awareness, computing literacy, computingfluency, and ending with computing expertise (Halaris, 1985). The meaning of computer literacy has evolved over the last 50years. Early in the history of computing, computer literacymeant having the ability to program a computer in COBOL orAssembly language. The advent of integrated computerenvironments and application suites and the prevalent use ofmicrocomputers instead of mainframes have shiftedclassification of computer literate persons from those that arelow- level tool builders to those who are high- level tool users(Chung, 1994). Modern definition of this term focus on twoareas: whatever a person needs to know and do with computerin order to function competently in our society and a measureof competency to exploit computer technology (Halaris, 1985). A report also stated that the teaching of computer literacy forbusiness majors should emphasize a personal needs approachthat that recognises the diverse needs for computer knowledgeand skills of individuals in different functional areas (Chung,1994). Importance of Communication Skills:Definitions and features of listening and interpersonalskills:Listening and interpersonal skills can be defined broadly asthose skills which one needs in order to communicateeffectively with another person or a group of people(Rungapadiachy,1999, p. 193). Although there is some variationin the literature over the exact skills that qualify under thisheading (Chant, et al 2002). According to authors(Rungapadiachy,1999, Hargie and Dickson, 2004, Hargie,1997,Hayes,2002) tend to agree on a number of core areas in whichcompetency is essential for effective interpersonal interactions. These include the following:Self- awareness: is considered to be a pre- requisite for thetype of other- awareness or empathy assumed to underlieeffective communication (Hayes, 2002). Effective listening: the ability to listen effectively is a coreskill in a range of interpersonal situations (Bostrom, 1997). Helping or facilitating: being effective at helping others isconsidered (Hayes, 2002, Rungapadiachy, 1999) an importantaspect of interpersonal competence. Ideas about helpingbehaviour from humanistic psychology have also had animportant influence in terms of generating research anddevelopments in the area of interpersonal skills teaching. Reflecting: is another skill that is closely related to thepsychological sciences or counselling more specifically is theability to reflect or present reflections. Hargie and Dickson(2004, p. 148) define reflections as statements in theinterviewer’s own words that encapsulate and represent theessence of the interviewees own words. Presenting reflectionsduring interactions can serve a similar information gatheringfunction to that seen in questioning. Assertiveness: being assertive is an important interpersonalskill for interactions in all domains. Asserting oneself can servemany different communicative functions including allowing theexpression of views clearly and openly and the avoidance ofnegative conflicts (Hargie and Dickson,2004). Non- verbal communications: A number of communicativeactivities also involve non-verbal behaviour and an ability todetect and portray messages through this medium is also seenas a central interpersonal skill (Harrigan et al, 2005). Importance of Group Work:Learning in higher education are changing. Active learning hasbecome an important focus in this time of pedagogical change. While the term encompasses a broad array of practices,collaborative learning, or small group work, remains animportant element of active learning theory and practice. According to Wasley (2006) students who participate incollaborative learning and educational activities outside theclassroom and who interact more with faculty members getbetter grades. Many people cringe and groan when told that they will need towork in a group. This phenomenon is called grouphate. Grouphate has been referred to as the dread and repulsion thatmany people feel about working in group or team (Sorenson,1981). However, these feelings diminish among groupmembers who have received proper instruction about workingin groups. One way to overcome grouphate is to form realisticexpectations of group work. According to Beebe and Masterson(2003), there are advantages and disadvantages to working ingroup. By understanding the benefits and potential pitfalls. Agroup can capitalise on the virtues of group work and minimisethe obstacles that hinder success. Advantages:Groups have more information than a single individual. Groupshave a greater well of resources to tap and more informationavailable because of the variety of backgrounds andexperiences. Groups stimulate creativity. In regard to problem solving, theold adage can be applied that two heads are better than one. Students remember group discussions better. Group learningfosters learning and comprehension. Students working in asmall group have a tendency to learn more of what is taughtand retain it longer than when the same material is presentedin other instructional formats (Burkley, et al 2005). Team work is highly valued by employers. Well developedinterpersonal skills were listed by employers among the top 10skills sought after in university graduates (Freeman &amp,Greenacre, 2010). Disadvantages:There may be pressure from the group to conform to themajority opinion. Most people do not like conflict and attemptto avoid it when possible. By readily acquiescing to the majorityopinion, the individual may agree to a bad solution just to avoidconflict Beebe &amp, Masterson (2003). Some members may rely too heavily on others to do the work. This is one of the most salient problems that face groups. Somemembers do not pitch in and help and do not adequatelycontribute to the group (Freeman &amp, Greenacre, 2011). Conclusion:In conclusion, PDP involves students reflecting on learning andachievements in their academic, personal, and work life andmaking plans for their educational, personal and careerdevelopment. PDP students should produce an e-portfolio whichrecords their learning experience and their reflection on thoseexperiences. And in today’s society, students will needcomputer literacy to get a good job because most of the jobsrequire computer literacy and communication skills. It isrecommended that group work is an important learningoutcome for student in higher education courses, however,group work helps students to accomplish success inassignments (Elgort, et al. 2008). BibliographyBarkley, E. F, Cross, K. P, &amp, Major, C. H. (2005). Collaborativelearning techniques: A Handbook for College Faculty. SanFrancisco: Jossey- Bass Publishers. Beebe, S. A, &amp, Masterson, J. T. (2003). Communicating in SmallGroups. Pearson Education Inc. Boston: Massachusetts. Bostrom, R. N. (1997). The Process of Listening. In O. Hargie(Ed). The Handbook of Communication Skills. London:Routledge. Chant, S. Jenkinson, T. Randle, J. &amp, Russell, G. (2002). Communication skills: Some problems in nursing educationpractice. Journal of Clinical Nursing. 11, 12-21. Chung S. Kim &amp, Nancy K. Keith (1994). Computer LiteracyTopics: A Comparison of View’s within a Business School. Journal of Information Systems Education. July, Volume 6,Number 2. Elgort, I. , Smith, A. G. , &amp, Toland, J. (2008). Is wiki an effectiveplatform for group course work? Australasian Journal ofEducation Technology. 24(2). 195-210. Freeman, L. , &amp, Greenacre, L. (2011). An Examination of SociallyDestructive Behaviours in Group Work. Journal of MarketingEducation, 33(1) p. 5-17. Graduate Outlook Survey (2010). University of Canterbury. Halaris, A &amp, Sloan, L (1985). Towards a Definition of ComputingLiteracy for the Liberal Arts Environment. Association ofComputing Machinery, pp. 320-326. Hargie, O. &amp, Dickson, D. (2004). Skilled InterpersonalCommunication: Research Theory and Practice (4th Edition). Hove: Routledge. Harrigan, J. A, Rosenthal, R. &amp, Scherer, K. R. (Eds. ) (2005). TheNew Handbook of Methods in Nonverbal Behaviour Research. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Hayes, J. (2002). Interpersonal Skills at Work (2nd Edition). Hove:Routledge. Quality Assurance Agency, (2009(a)) Personal DevelopmentPlanning: Guide to institutional policy and practice in highereducation. http://www. qaa. ac. uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Documents/PDPguide. pdf. Rungapadiachy, D. M. (1999). Interpersonal Communicationand Psychology for Health Care Professionals: Theory andPractice. Edinburgh: Butterworth- Heinemann. Sorenson, S. M. (1981). Group Hate: A Negative Reaction toGroup Work. Paper Presented at the Annual Meeting of theInternational Communication Association (Minneapolis, MN. May21-25, 1981). Tanyel, F &amp, Mitchell, M &amp, McAlum, H. (1999). The Skill Set forSuccess of New Business Graduates: Do Prospective Employersand University Faculty Agree? Journal of Education for Business. 75 (1), Sept/Oct, 33-37. Wasley, P. (2006). Under represented students benefit mostfrom engagement. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 53 (13),p. A39.

Originally posted 2018-07-05 16:53:17. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING (REPORT) Students Name: Adesoji Majekodunmi

Question
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING
(REPORT)
Students Name: Adesoji Majekodunmi
Students ID: 42448
Module Leader: Anthony Attah
Module Code: A006

CONTENTS
Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………….3
Definition of PDP …………………………………………………………………………………………..3
Importance of Communication Skill ………………………………………………………………3
Definitions and features of listening and interpersonal skills ……………………..3
Self- awareness ………………………………………………………………………………………….3
Effective listening ……………………………………………………………………………………….4
Helping or facilitating …………………………………………………………………………………4
Reflecting …………………………………………………………………………………………………..4
Assertiveness ……………………………………………………………………………………………..4
Non- verbal communication ……………………………………………………………………….4
Importance of Group Work …………………………………………………………………………..4
Advantages…………………………………………………………………………………………………5
Disadvantages ……………………………………………………………………………………………5
Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………………………………………5
Bibliography …………………………………………………………………………………………………7

REPORT ON PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING

Introduction:
In this report, the significance of Personal Development
Planning (PDP) would be discussed and analyse the importance
of computer literacy, communication skills and group work, and
reflecting how students can benefit from PDP and make
endorsements.
Definition of PDP:
Personal Development Planning (PDP) is a structured and
supported process undertaken by an individual to reflect upon
their own learning, performance or achievement and to plan for
their personal, educational and career development (QAA,
2009a, p.2).
PDP at GSM is an inclusive process, open to all learners at all
levels. Effective PDP improves the capacity of individuals to
review, plan and take responsibility for their learning and to
understand what they learn and how they learn it (QAA, 2009a,
p.2). Engaging in the process of PDP helps learners to articulate
their learning and achievement more explicitly and supports
learning as a lifelong and life wide activity (QAA, 2009a).
Importance of Computer Literacy:
Students, educators and employers differ in their perspectives
when it comes to computer literacy. A teacher may feel
students are computer literate if they can use a computer
application to complete an assignment without additional
tutoring or hand- holding. Employers want productive, highly
motivated computer- savvy employees who can make things
happen. Every time an employer has to resort to additional
training for an unskilled employee, it costs the employer time
and money.
The younger generation of students has a universal view of
computer literacy; they want to know how to use the computer
for activities that are important to them. Teachers have an

immediate view of computer literacy often referred to as
computer competency. Teachers just want students to be
successful solving computer- based problems without any
additional work on the teacher’s part. According to Tanyel et al,
(1999) shows that faculty and employers do not always agree
upon the same definition of computer literacy. An employer
wants workers who are competent in industry specific computer
applications, who can easily learn new computer skills, and who
can adapt to new situations. Employers value computing
fluency and expertise. In reality, each of these viewpoints is
valid if one views computer literacy as a continuum: beginning
with computing awareness, computing literacy, computing
fluency, and ending with computing expertise (Halaris, 1985).
The meaning of computer literacy has evolved over the last 50
years. Early in the history of computing, computer literacy
meant having the ability to program a computer in COBOL or
Assembly language. The advent of integrated computer
environments and application suites and the prevalent use of
microcomputers instead of mainframes have shifted
classification of computer literate persons from those that are
low- level tool builders to those who are high- level tool users
(Chung, 1994). Modern definition of this term focus on two
areas: whatever a person needs to know and do with computer
in order to function competently in our society and a measure
of competency to exploit computer technology (Halaris, 1985).
A report also stated that the teaching of computer literacy for
business majors should emphasize a personal needs approach
that that recognises the diverse needs for computer knowledge
and skills of individuals in different functional areas (Chung,
1994).
Importance of Communication Skills:
Definitions and features of listening and interpersonal
skills:
Listening and interpersonal skills can be defined broadly as
those skills which one needs in order to communicate
effectively with another person or a group of people

(Rungapadiachy,1999, p.193). Although there is some variation
in the literature over the exact skills that qualify under this
heading (Chant, et al 2002). According to authors
(Rungapadiachy,1999; Hargie and Dickson, 2004; Hargie,1997;
Hayes,2002) tend to agree on a number of core areas in which
competency is essential for effective interpersonal interactions.
These include the following:
Self- awareness: is considered to be a pre- requisite for the
type of other- awareness or empathy assumed to underlie
effective communication (Hayes, 2002).
Effective listening: the ability to listen effectively is a core
skill in a range of interpersonal situations (Bostrom, 1997).
Helping or facilitating: being effective at helping others is
considered (Hayes, 2002; Rungapadiachy, 1999) an important
aspect of interpersonal competence. Ideas about helping
behaviour from humanistic psychology have also had an
important influence in terms of generating research and
developments in the area of interpersonal skills teaching.
Reflecting: is another skill that is closely related to the
psychological sciences or counselling more specifically is the
ability to reflect or present reflections. Hargie and Dickson
(2004, p.148) define reflections as statements in the
interviewer’s own words that encapsulate and represent the
essence of the interviewees own words. Presenting reflections
during interactions can serve a similar information gathering
function to that seen in questioning.
Assertiveness: being assertive is an important interpersonal
skill for interactions in all domains. Asserting oneself can serve
many different communicative functions including allowing the
expression of views clearly and openly and the avoidance of
negative conflicts (Hargie and Dickson,2004).
Non- verbal communications: A number of communicative
activities also involve non-verbal behaviour and an ability to
detect and portray messages through this medium is also seen
as a central interpersonal skill (Harrigan et al, 2005).

Importance of Group Work:
Learning in higher education are changing. Active learning has
become an important focus in this time of pedagogical change.
While the term encompasses a broad array of practices,
collaborative learning, or small group work, remains an
important element of active learning theory and practice.
According to Wasley (2006) students who participate in
collaborative learning and educational activities outside the
classroom and who interact more with faculty members get
better grades.
Many people cringe and groan when told that they will need to
work in a group. This phenomenon is called grouphate.
Grouphate has been referred to as the dread and repulsion that
many people feel about working in group or team (Sorenson,
1981). However, these feelings diminish among group
members who have received proper instruction about working
in groups. One way to overcome grouphate is to form realistic
expectations of group work. According to Beebe and Masterson
(2003), there are advantages and disadvantages to working in
group. By understanding the benefits and potential pitfalls. A
group can capitalise on the virtues of group work and minimise
the obstacles that hinder success.
Advantages:
Groups have more information than a single individual. Groups
have a greater well of resources to tap and more information
available because of the variety of backgrounds and
experiences.
Groups stimulate creativity. In regard to problem solving, the
old adage can be applied that two heads are better than one.
Students remember group discussions better. Group learning
fosters learning and comprehension. Students working in a
small group have a tendency to learn more of what is taught
and retain it longer than when the same material is presented
in other instructional formats (Burkley, et al 2005).
Team work is highly valued by employers. Well developed
interpersonal skills were listed by employers among the top 10

skills sought after in university graduates (Freeman &
Greenacre, 2010).
Disadvantages:
There may be pressure from the group to conform to the
majority opinion. Most people do not like conflict and attempt
to avoid it when possible. By readily acquiescing to the majority
opinion, the individual may agree to a bad solution just to avoid
conflict Beebe & Masterson (2003).
Some members may rely too heavily on others to do the work.
This is one of the most salient problems that face groups. Some
members do not pitch in and help and do not adequately
contribute to the group (Freeman & Greenacre, 2011).
Conclusion:
In conclusion, PDP involves students reflecting on learning and
achievements in their academic, personal, and work life and
making plans for their educational, personal and career
development. PDP students should produce an e-portfolio which
records their learning experience and their reflection on those
experiences. And in today’s society, students will need
computer literacy to get a good job because most of the jobs
require computer literacy and communication skills. It is
recommended that group work is an important learning
outcome for student in higher education courses, however,
group work helps students to accomplish success in
assignments (Elgort, et al. 2008).

Bibliography
Barkley, E. F, Cross, K. P, & Major, C. H. (2005). Collaborative
learning techniques: A Handbook for College Faculty. San
Francisco: Jossey- Bass Publishers.
Beebe, S. A, & Masterson, J. T. (2003). Communicating in Small
Groups. Pearson Education Inc. Boston: Massachusetts.
Bostrom, R.N. (1997). The Process of Listening. In O. Hargie
(Ed). The Handbook of Communication Skills. London:
Routledge.
Chant, S. Jenkinson, T. Randle, J. & Russell, G. (2002).
Communication skills: Some problems in nursing education
practice. Journal of Clinical Nursing. 11, 12-21.

Chung S. Kim & Nancy K. Keith (1994). Computer Literacy
Topics: A Comparison of View’s within a Business School.
Journal of Information Systems Education. July, Volume 6,
Number 2.
Elgort, I., Smith, A. G., & Toland, J. (2008). Is wiki an effective
platform for group course work? Australasian Journal of
Education Technology. 24(2). 195-210.
Freeman, L., & Greenacre, L. (2011). An Examination of Socially
Destructive Behaviours in Group Work. Journal of Marketing
Education, 33(1) p.5-17. Graduate Outlook Survey (2010).
University of Canterbury.
Halaris, A & Sloan, L (1985). Towards a Definition of Computing
Literacy for the Liberal Arts Environment. Association of
Computing Machinery, pp. 320-326.
Hargie, O. & Dickson, D. (2004). Skilled Interpersonal
Communication: Research Theory and Practice (4th Edition).
Hove: Routledge.
Harrigan, J. A, Rosenthal, R. & Scherer, K. R. (Eds.) (2005). The
New Handbook of Methods in Nonverbal Behaviour Research.
Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Hayes, J. (2002). Interpersonal Skills at Work (2nd Edition). Hove:
Routledge.
Quality Assurance Agency, (2009(a)) Personal Development
Planning: Guide to institutional policy and practice in higher
education.
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Doc
uments/PDPguide.pdf.
Rungapadiachy, D. M. (1999). Interpersonal Communication
and Psychology for Health Care Professionals: Theory and
Practice. Edinburgh: Butterworth- Heinemann.
Sorenson, S. M. (1981). Group Hate: A Negative Reaction to
Group Work. Paper Presented at the Annual Meeting of the
International Communication Association (Minneapolis, MN. May
21-25, 1981).

Tanyel, F & Mitchell, M & McAlum, H. (1999). The Skill Set for
Success of New Business Graduates: Do Prospective Employers
and University Faculty Agree? Journal of Education for Business.
75 (1), Sept/Oct, 33-37.
Wasley, P. (2006). Under represented students benefit most
from engagement. The Chronicle of Higher Education, 53 (13),
p.A39.