Starting the Research Process

QUESTION

Starting the Research Process

Starting the Research Process

Formulating a specific, applicable research problem statement is an important step in beginning a research process. The problem statement defines the focus of the research study, dictates what methods and tools will be used, and sets the stage for all subsequent elements of the research process. Because of this, it is necessary to put a great deal of thought into the problem statement to ensure that the rest of the research process will be well planned and appropriate to the problem at hand.

This week’s Discussion asks you to identify evidence-based practice problems that can be addressed using quantitative research methods. Based on the practice problem you select, formulate a quantitative research problem statement. In this Discussion, you are also given the opportunity to evaluate your colleagues’ problem statements. Please refer to this week’s Learning Resources for appropriate and scholarly examples of research problem statements and how they inform the rest of the research process.

To prepare:

  • Determine a nursing practice problem that is of interest to you and that is appropriate for a quantitative research study. Note: You will continue to use this problem in the Discussions over the next several weeks.
  • Using the Walden Library and other credible sources, locate and read two or three articles that address your practice problem. (you must cite the articles read in this assignment)
  • With your practice problem in mind, review the Learning Resources and media presentations focusing on the strategies presented for generating a research problem statement.
  • Ask yourself: What is the importance of my practice problem to nursing, research, and theory? How might addressing this problem bring about positive social change? How will investigating this problem support evidence-based practice?

By Tomorrow 09/06/17, write a minimum of 550 words in APA format with a minimum of 3 references from the list below which include the level one headings as numbered below:

Post

1)    A proposed research problem statement ( it has to be related to nursing for example: could be on diabetes, heart failure or more …)

2)    Including sufficient information to make your focus clear and explaining how addressing this problem may bring about positive social change.

Required Media

Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011). Research methods for evidence-based practice: Selecting a research topic and developing a hypothesis. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Note:  The approximate length of this media piece is 13 minutes.

In this week’s video, Dr. Leiyu Shi discusses the characteristics of a good research hypothesis and details the steps in developing a hypothesis that can be tested through research.

Laureate Education. (2011). Important events in clinical research history. Retrieved from http://mym.cdn.laureate-media.com/2dett4d/Walden/CLRA/6100/01/mm/timeline/index.html

This timeline identifies and describes key historical events related to the development of clinical research throughout the ages.

Required Readings

Gray, J.R., Grove,  S.K., & Sutherland, S. (2017). Burns  and Grove’s the practice of nursing research: Appraisal, synthesis, and generation of evidence (8th ed.). St.  Louis, MO: Saunders Elsevier.

•Chapter 5, “Research Problem and Purpose”

Chapter 5 outlines how to identify and develop a research problem statement, purpose, and research questions. The chapter also provides examples of both quantitative and qualitative research topics, problems, and purpose.

•Chapter 6, “Objectives, Questions, Variables, and Hypothesis”

This chapter explains the different types of hypotheses and assesses how research variables can be used to formulate research objectives in both quantitative and qualitative studies.

•Chapter 10, “Quantitative Methodology: Noninterventional Designs and Methods”

Chapter 10 describes the principles of research design and those foundational concepts that influence the selection of an appropriate quantitative design: causality, bias, manipulation, control, and validity.

•Chapter 11, “Quantitative Methodology: Interventional Designs and Methods”

This chapter builds on the material presented in Chapter 10 and discusses how to select the most appropriate quantitative research design for addressing a particular research problem.

Select one of the following articles to use for this week’s Assignment:

Fouquier, K.F. (2011). The concept of motherhood among three generations of African American women. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 43(2), 145–153. (See attached files)

Grey, M., Whittemore, R., Jaser, S., Ambrosino, J., Lindemann, E., Liberti, L., Northrup, V., & Dziura, J. (2009). Effects of coping skills training in school-age children with Type 1 diabetes. Research in Nursing & Health, 32, 405–418. (See attached files)

Methey, N.A., Davis-Jackson, J., & Stewart, B.J. (2010). Effectiveness of an aspiration risk-reduction protocol. Nursing Research, 59, 18–25. (See attached files)

Newhouse, R.P., Morlock. L., Pronovost, P., & Breckenridge-Sproat, S. (2011). Rural hospital nursing: Results of a national survey of nurse executives. Journal of Nursing Administration, 41(3), 129–137. (See attached files)

Handouts

Laureate Education. (2011). Litmus test for a doctoral-level research problem. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Optional Resources

Caress, A., Luker, K., & Chalmers, K. (2010). Promoting the health of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Patients’ and carers’ views. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 19(3–4), 564–573.

Mbeba, M. M., N., Jere, D. L., Kachingwe, S. I., Crittenden, K. S., McCreary, L. L., ... Norr, K. F. (2011). Peer group intervention reduces personal HIV risk for Malawian health workers. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 43(1), 72–81.

Miller, J., Gaboda, D., Nugent, C., Simpson, T., & Cantor, J. (2011). Parental eligibility and enrollment in state children’s health insurance program: The roles of parental health, employment, and family structure. American Journal of Public Health, 101(2), 274–277.

Su, C., Lu, X., Chen, W., & Wang, T. (2009). Promoting self-management improves the health status of patients having peritoneal dialysis. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 65(7), 1381–1389.

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