Trident HIS205 full course (All case and SLPS)

Question
HIS205 History and Impact of the Internet (SEP2015FT-1)

Module 1 – Case

PRE-INTERNET DEVELOPMENT

Let’s start off with some general context. Here’s a very interesting short video, worth watching:

Bilgil, M. (2009) History of the Internet. Vimeo. [Video file]. Retrieved from http://vimeo.com/2696386

You may also want to review some of the sources listed in the Background as “of general interest”, with particular attention to the pre-1990 periods.

In the introduction to the module, we mentioned Doug Englebart and his vision of computer-augmented human effort. In this case, you’ll have a chance to see Doug in action and get a sense for how his ideas became leveraged into our current Internet-based information environment. Stanford University has compiled a unique set of videos of the first public demonstration of Englebart’s Augment system. Here’s how their website introduces these videos:

“On December 9, 1968, Douglas C. Engelbart and the group of 17 researchers working with him in the Augmentation Research Center at Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, CA, presented a 90-minute live public demonstration of the online system, NLS, they had been working on since 1962. The public presentation was a session of the Fall Joint Computer Conference held at the Convention Center in San Francisco, and it was attended by about 1,000 computer professionals. This was the public debut of the computer mouse. But the mouse was only one of many innovations demonstrated that day, including hypertext, object addressing and dynamic file linking, as well as shared-screen collaboration involving two persons at different sites communicating over a network with audio and video interface.

The original 100-minute video of this event is part of the Engelbart Collection in Special Collections of Stanford University. This original video has been edited into 35 segments and reformatted as Flash streaming video clips. There is a brief abstract of the subject matter treated in each segment.”

You can see the whole collection along with some supplementary information online at http://sloan.stanford.edu/MouseSite/1968Demo.html. Of particular interest are Clips 1-3, 7, 9-11, 15, 21, 25, 31, and 34; of course, if possible it’s best to watch the a video stream of the complete demo.

In a later interview, Englebart summed up the accomplishments of his project thusly:

“We weren’t interested in ‘automation’ but in ‘augmentation.’ We were not just building a tool, we were designing an entire system for working with knowledge. Automation means if you’re milking a cow, you get a tool that will milk it for you. But to augment the milking of a cow, you invent the telephone. The telephone not only changes how you milk, but the rest of the way you work as well. It touches the entire process. It was a paradigm shift.” Jordan, K. (2004). The Click heard round The world. Wired. Retrieved from http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/12.01/mouse_pr.html]

This language of “augmentation” rather than “automation” or even “computerization” has been characteristic of all Englebart’s approach; here’s a good short suimmary of this in his own words. Please zoom (+) the article in order to read it.

Englebart, D. (1995). Toward augmenting the human intellect and boosting our collective IQ. Communications of the ACM. Retrieved from http://www.scribd.com/doc/53882235/Boosting-our-Collective-IQ-DR-DOUGLAS-C-ENGELBART

Of course, this isn’t the only competing vision for the future of work; here’s a good summary of some of the various approaches taken, putting Englebart in a wider context, down to the present:

Pearson Education Inc. (2008). Lecture 2: Interaction paradigms.

When you’ve had a chance to view the demonstrations and read about their context, and perhaps done some further research yourself on the Internet relating to these issues, you’ll be in a position to write a short (3-5 page) paper on the question:

“Why did it take 25 or more years for Englebart’s ideas about work tools to start to be widely implemented in work groups?”

Assignment Expectations

Your paper should be between 3-5 pages. Take a definite stand on the issues, and develop your supporting argument carefully. Using material from the background information and any other sources you can find to support specific points in your argument is highly recommended; try to avoid making assertions for which you can find no support other than your own opinion.

Be sure to provide proper citations for any material you reference from other sources! Please be guided by the TUI Guidelines cited in the background information for help in structuring and developing your paper.

You will be particularly assessed on:

Your ability to see what the module is all about and to structure your paper accordingly.

Your informed commentary and analysis — simply repeating what your sources say does not constitute an adequate paper.

Your ability to draw on a range of sources, and to establish your understanding of the historical context of the question

Module 1 – SLP

PRE-INTERNET DEVELOPMENT

The purpose of the Session Long Project in Trident University classes is to give you the opportunity to explore the applicability of the Module to your own life, work, and place in space and time, and to experiment with the Module to see how the otherwise academically rigorous presentation of a topic may, with more or less work and/or trauma, become “up close and personal”. This is done in a number of different ways — sometimes cumulative papers, sometimes practical hands-on experimentation with a tool of some sort, sometimes reflections on a place of work or life. The common thread is personal application, aimed at demonstrating a cumulative knowledge and understanding of the course’s material. The main purpose of the written parts of the project assignments is to show that you’ve had some experiences doing the project, that you’ve thought carefully about what they mean for your own education, and that you can make some personal applications of this meaning to your own professional and/or personal understanding. Demonstrating this understanding is actually considerably more important than carrying out any specific step in the project instructions.

For this course, the Project will take the form of hands-on encounters with pieces of the Internet. You’re pretty much going to have to have access to the Internet to take this course effectively. Not having such access would be rather like taking a course in astronomy without a telescope, or even access to the sky.

It is a good idea to be sure that your computer is appropriately protected from the Bad Guys Out There. There are some security precautions that are particularly important to observe before setting out on any Internet excursion, including these projects. In particular, it is essential that if you are going to download anything from the Internet, that you have adequate virus protection and anti-adware/spyware/malware screening on your systems. Please review our suggestions for preparing your computer for active Internet use before diving headlong into that world.

Most online demo sites, when you encounter them, will require you to enter a name and an email address by way of registration; if this bothers you, try using a pseudonym and a convenient, free email account from Hotmail or Gmail or Yahoo, or just try some other name. All they want is a place to send a password, generally. It is also possible that you will receive follow-up inquiries from sites that you have visited. For a fuller discussion of these issues, please read our policy note/advisory on website relationships. If you work in an area subject to security clearances and regulations, or if the computer to which you have access is restricted in critical ways in terms of what you are at liberty to download and use (because of capacity, policy and/or security rules, or other factors) then your ability to carry out the assignments as presented may somewhat compromised. Never Fear! TUI is known for its flexibility and ability to reconfigure assignments imaginatively, and we stand ready to help you here as well! Please review our policy on assignments and national security. Alternatives are available, and while you might miss some of the learning benefits of the assignment, you can still get a substantial measure. Please let your instructor know as soon as you can if you will be operating under any sort of limitations on your computing capacity, so that you can work out suitable arrangements.

So — that’s the general SLP approach for this course. If you have questions at any point about what to do or how to strategize your exercises, please contact your instructor for illumination and assistance.

SLP Assignment Overview

As we said earlier, the development of the Internet involved a considerable period of more-or-less parallel evolution of a number of technologies and organizations. But like any process of social evolution, some happenings were more important than others in terms of influencing where we are today. Your task in this project is to identify some of those key turning points.

There are a lot of tools to help you. One of the most useful is “Hobbes’ Internet Timeline 10.2” found at http://www.zakon.org/robert/internet/timeline/, a compilation of key events in Internet evolution dating back to the 1950’s. You should also be prepared to consult some of the readings and other resources suggested in the Background page as useful sources of information. Your aim is to get a picture clear in your mind about how the different threads of the Internet got woven together.

So here’s your specific task in this assignment:

Identify what you consider to be the ten or so most important and/or significant events contributing to the evolution of the modern Internet that occurred in the period 1800-1991.

For each event, you should also provide a paragraph or so explaining why you consider this to be one of the most important milestones toward the Internet.

The tenth and last event in your catalogue should be the following, from Hobbes’ 1992 listing:

“World-Wide Web (WWW) released by CERN; Tim Berners-Lee developer (:pb1:). First Web server is nxoc01.cern.ch, launched in Nov 1990 and later renamed info.cern.ch.”

Many of the events you’ll find listed in the Hobbes timeline, but it’s not the only source you probably want to draw on. Be sure to include both technological developments and social/organizational events in your listing.

SLP Assignment Expectations

Your paper should be 2-3 pages in length, and reflect your personal experiences with the timeline. The important part of all these project assignments is to carefully assess your own experiences with the topic, and then reflect critically on what you might have learned about yourself and about situations through this assessment process.

The more that you can use the exercise to develop personal implications for your growth as a potential business person as well as an Internet-savvy individual, the more value you’ll get out of the exercise.

Module 2 – Case

WEB 1.0: 1992-2001

Your case assignment is to consider the great “dot-com” boom and bust, and to understand its influence on the Internet of today. It marked the major watershed in the brief history of the Internet, and is this a worthy focus for this second module.

There is certainly no shortage of material describing this significant set of events. Probably the best place to begin for an overview is the following video.

CWnEconomy. (2012, February 24). Dot-com bubble documentary. [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2FybpdrlYM

Here are two other good sources tracing these events:

Norwood, J. (2011). History of the Internet Timeline. High Speed Internet. Retrieved from http://www.high-speed-internet-access-guide.com/articles/internet-timeline.html

WiseGeek. (2012). What was the Dot-com bubble? Retrieved from http://www.wisegeek.com/what-was-the-dot-com-bubble.htm

The Background Information page lists a number of other possible sources; in addition, the general resources listed in the syllabus and under Module 1 are worth consulting in many cases. Finally, you are encouraged to do your own independent research on the Internet itself; Google can deliver to you in seconds vast quantities of information. Try not to drown in it, however.

Optional Reading

Kehoe, B. (1992). Zen and the Art of the Internet: A Beginner’s Guide to the Internet. First Edition. Retrieved from http://www.cs.indiana.edu/docproject/zen/zen-1.0_toc.html

H., B. (2011). History of E-commerce. Sell It! On the Web. Retrieved from http://sellitontheweb.com/blog/history-of-e-commerce/

When you’ve read a number of these sources about the bubble and have a good feel for it, you’ll be in a position to write a short (3-5 page) paper on the topic:

The Major Effects of the “Dot-Com Bubble Burst” on the Internet of Today

Assignment Expectations

Your paper should be between 2-4 pages. Take a definite stand on the issues, and develop your supporting argument carefully. Using material from the background information and any other sources you can find to support specific points in your argument is highly recommended; try to avoid making assertions for which you can find no support other than your own opinion.

Be sure to provide proper citations for any material you reference from other sources! Please be guided by the TUI Guidelines cited in the Module 1 background information for help in structuring and developing your paper.

You will be particularly assessed on:

Your ability to see what the module is all about and to structure your paper accordingly.

Your informed commentary and analysis — simply repeating what your sources say does not constitute an adequate paper.

Your ability to draw on a range of sources, and to establish your understanding of the historical context of the question.

Module 2 – SLP

WEB 1.0: 1992-2001

In January 1992, Brendan P. Kehoe released the first edition of his “Zen and the Art of the Internet: A Beginner’s Guide to the Internet”; you can access this guide at http://www.cs.indiana.edu/docproject/zen/zen-1.0_toc.html. It is an extremely accurate explanation of the technology behind the Internet and how it was used at that point in time.

The project assignment for this module asks you to understand what the Internet was then by reviewing this explanation. You should at least skim through the entire linked document, concentrating particularly on any parts of it that you’ve never heard of. Your object is not to use it as a learning guide – a large portion of it is today wholly obsolete – but rather to get a feel for how the different parts fitted together at that time. So you’re not reading it for its technical detail as much as for its sense of the user and what s/he might need to know at the time.

When you’ve developed a good understanding of what Kehoe was conveying in this rather (for its time) revolutionary document, please prepare a short (2-3 page) paper discussing:

“In a brief summary, describe what it was like to “use the Internet” in the period described by Kehoe. Focus your discussion on e-mail, anonymous FTP, Usenet News, and Telnet.”

SLP Assignment Expectations

Your paper should be two to three pages in length, and reflect your personal experiences with the guide. The important part of all these project assignments is to carefully assess your own experiences with the topic, and then reflect critically on what you might have learned about yourself and about situations through this assessment process.

The more that you can use the exercise to develop personal implications for your growth as a potential business person as well as an Internet-savvy individual, the more value you’ll get out of the exercise.

Module 3 – Case

WEB 2.0: 2001-NOW

It is a truism in the study of human technology that any tool that makes it into the public’s attention will eventually be used for purposes entirely unforeseen by its inventor(s) and probably contrary to the general public interest. This is certainly been the case with the information technologies going up around and with the Internet. E-mail is great, but spam isn’t. Online video of the grandkids is wonderful; online pornography accessible to little Johnny, not so much. Despite much breastbeating, it’s really very difficult to have the good without the bad — and even differentiating the good from the bad is often a matter of opinion. As Miles’ Law says, where you stand depends upon where you sit.

In the past couple of years, we have become so saturated with and dependent upon social media such as Facebook and Twitter that we haven’t always noticed the potential Dark Side — most specifically, the ability to use these tools not only to connect individuals in cyberspace but to mobilize groups for action in the Real World. There’s a phenomenon of relatively recent — or at least reinvented — origin, called the “flash mob” — defined most generally as a group of people voluntarily assembled at a particular place and time for a particular purpose, coordinated through shared access to social media. These aren’t altogether a new invention — the phone and before that, the telegraph, and before that, a good strong voice have been tools used to assemble flash mobs in the past. But what’s been recently discovered is how easy it is to do so using modern social media, and how effective such mobs can be.

As we said, whether or not you consider this to be a good development or a bad development depends a lot on how you evaluate the purpose of the mob. Public assemblies to install democracy in an authoritarian state sound pretty good; assembling gang members to break windows and burn cars wouldn’t strike most of us as all that great. Here’s a sampling of different points of view on this general subject:

Tavoulareas, E. (2011, August 22). Social media: The Jekyll & Hyde of media? Changemakers. Retrieved from http://www.changemakers.com/blog/social-media-jekyll-hyde-media

Goodman, J. (2011, August 17). Debate over social media incitement as flash mobs strike. The Lede: Blogging the News. New York Times. Retrieved from http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/08/17/debate-over-social-media-incitement-as-flash-mobs-strike/

Brennan, E. (2011, August 19). Flash Mobs – The dark side of social media revealed. Retrieved from http://www.i-policy.org/2011/08/flash-mobs-the-dark-side-of-social-media-revealed.html

Lum, R. (2011) Spreading the happiness one flash mob at a time. CreativeGuerillaMarketing. Retrieved from http://www.creativeguerrillamarketing.com/guerrilla-marketing/spreading-happiness-flash-mob-time/

Optional Reading

Kelly, L. (2011, March 22). Advertising with flash mobs. JSNCafe. Retrieved from http://jsncafe.com/2011/03/advertising-with-flash-mobs/

Heaney, F. (n.d.) The short life of flash mobs. Stay Free!. Retrieved from http://www.stayfreemagazine.org/archives/24/flash-mobs-history.html

The Economist. (2006, August 29). Shop affronts: Chinese consumers are ganging up on their retailers. Retrieved from http://www.economist.com/node/7121669/print?story_id=7121669

This last article is notable particularly for a comment reaching new levels of cluelessness, to wit:

“’This is not what social media was designed to accomplish’, states Ken Wisnefski, who was recently interviewed on FOX News discussing cyber security. ‘At WebiMax, we build social media campaigns for our clients to increase their brand awareness and develop additional revenue streams. The organizing of ‘flash mobs’ in Philadelphia demonstrates the capabilities of the misuse of one of the most powerful mass-communications tools in the 21st century.’”

In other words, “It’s perfectly all right for us to use this tool to sell you stuff, but how dare you think of using it for any other purpose?” Mr. Wisnefski has obviously missed the entire point of Web 2.0 — that is, user participation, user generation of content, and interactivity. There’s no stuffing that particular genie back in the bottle.

Once you’ve read these short articles on flash mobs, you’ll probably want to do some additional Internet research of your own looking into other aspects of this phenomenon and other kinds of areas where they have occurred. When you feel you have a good handle on the idea, you’ll be in a position to write a 2- to 4-page paper on the topic:

What ought to be done about “flash mobs,” and by whom? Why?

Assignment Expectations

Your paper should be from 2 to 4 pages in length. Take a definite stand on the issues, and develop your supporting argument carefully. Using material from the background information and any other sources you can find to support specific points in your argument is highly recommended; try to avoid making assertions for which you can find no support other than your own opinion.

Be sure to provide proper citations for any material you reference from other sources! Please be guided by the TUI Guidelines cited in the background information for help in structuring and developing your paper.

You will be particularly assessed on:

Your ability to see what the module is all about and to structure your paper accordingly.

Your informed commentary and analysis — simply repeating what your sources say does not constitute an adequate paper.

Your ability to draw on a range of sources, and to establish your understanding of the historical context of the question.

Module 3 – SLP

WEB 2.0: 2001-NOW

It is said that a picture is worth 1000 words. If this is so, then the average SLP essay of 2-3 pages, which averages out to just about 1000 words, should be worth a picture. So that’s what we’re going to do in this SLP assignment: draw a picture.

Last year, P2PU, the online “school of webcraft”, offered a course entitled “Web 200: Anatomy of a Request”. Basically, it dealt with some of the more technical aspects of Internet processes, although many of the students were not particularly technically inclined. Early in this course, an assignment was given — and the same assignment is now being given to you, as follows:

“Hey Everyone,

Your assignment, which is due by the end of the day on Tuesday is to draw a picture of how the internet works. You don’t need to do any research for this assignment, I just want you to use your current knowledge and represent it graphically.

You can use any application you’d like.”

If you find this assignment a little intimidating or confusing you might want to see some samples of what the students in the P2PU course came up with; you can page through the different student pictures here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/johndbritton/sets/72157624932677905/detail/

[Note that you can click on any picture to see it full size — one of these was actually done by Your Instructor, although I’m not going to tell you which one.]

As you see, none of these are highly technical, and some of them are downright whimsical. But interestingly, they all reflect many of the same general kinds of concepts about what the Internet is and how it is shaped. Obviously, there is no one “correct” picture to be drawn. The aim here is simply for you to reflect your own understanding about what are the critical elements of the Internet and how they are linked to each other.

Most of you probably have some degree of experience with online drawing tools and some accessibility to such tools; even if you don’t have experience, the available tools are easy enough to learn the basics quickly. At the low end, every Windows computer comes with an application called MSPaint, which is certainly adequate for the purposes of this exercise. Moving up the line, you might use MS PowerPoint or possibly Photoshop, or one of any number of free online drawing tools that you can find linked here – Queeky is particularly nice if you like to draw boxes and arrows and such (note that none of these tools require you to download or install anything.) There is also SketchUp from Google, another free but very powerful drawing tool. Or, at the other end of the techno-spectrum, you could always draw your picture in pencil on the back of an old envelope and find someone to scan it into digital form for you. In any event, there are multiple ways to come up with such a picture in this great wide Internet of hours. If you encounter any particular difficulty with finding a way to carry out this assignment, please let your instructor know as soon as possible so that you can work out some way of completing it.

SLP Assignment Expectations

Your paper only needs to include your graphic, although you’re welcome to add whatever commentary you feel is necessary by way of explanation. It should reflect your personal ideas about the shape and elements of the Internet. You WILL be assessed on the degree to which you include relevant elements and appropriate relationships; you will NOT be assessed on the quality of your artwork or your degree of mastery of whatever drawing tool you choose to use.

The important part of all these project assignments is to carefully assess your own experiences with the topic, and then reflect critically on what you might have learned about yourself and about situations through this assessment process.

The more that you can use the exercise to develop personal implications for your growth as a potential business person as well as an Internet-savvy individual, the more value you’ll get out of the exercise.

Module 4 – Case

WEB 3.0: THE SEMANTIC WEB AND BEYOND

The idea of a Semantic Web has been around for over ten years although many critics are skeptical about its feasibility. While other groups have split opinions, they draw their attention to innovation. For example, one school of thought believes that Web 3.0 is already here with the current advances in web technology. The other school of thought supports that Web 3.0 is evolving as Artificial Intelligence (AI) is added to combine information indexing and classification to simulate patterns of human reasoning and logic. Although computers can store large amounts of data and present it in patterns, they cannot associate undefined patterns. Web 3.0 in the context of AI would be able to close that gap by detecting information patterns and integrating them in a dynamic process. Search engines capable of adapting to semantic technology would allow users to find, share, and collect information using natural language.

So, is the Semantic Web really here? We have certainly come a long way… Web 1.0 consisted of static webpages. We could read, but not much else. Web 2.0 has opened up the dialogue among people, and it has created a new industry of social networking through blogging and Facebook. We are putting our ideas out there. Technologies to facilitate tagging, blogs, wikis, and podcast/videos are among the popular advances in Web 2.0. The productivity of online systems has being significant. Internet applications have grown among a wide range of industries as a result of interactive online systems. The reaction of people to these products and services has been phenomenal, and it has contributed to a new social digital economy that did not exist with Web 1.0. Some of the advances that we see more recently are natural language queries like “Where do I buy product X in California?” Someone querying this statement appreciates a search engine returning several company links or even blogs where people are discussing the same product or asking the same question. The concept of tagging will carry through Web 3.0.

The following materials introduce Web 3.0 from a historical perspective. Dr. Yuen’s site provides three short videos: Evolution Web 1.0, Web 2.0 to Web 3.0; The Future Internet: Service Web 3.0; and Web 3.0: Semantic Web. All materials are meant to familiarize the student with Web 3.0 features. The Web 3.0 implications to businesses and consumers are covered in the last article.

Wheeler, S. (2011, January 5). A brief introduction to Web 3.0. Cognitive Interfund Transfer. Retrieved from http://cognitiveinterfundtransfer.blogspot.com/2011/01/brief-introduction-to-web-30.html

Gaines, K. (n.d.). A brief introduction to Web 3.0. Web Designer. Retrieved from http://www.1stwebdesigner.com/design/web-3-introduction/

Yuen, S. (2010, September 19). Web 3.0. Learning Technologies. Retrieved from http://scyuen.wordpress.com/2010/09/17/web-3-0/

Verizon. (2010). Web 3.0: Its promise and implications to consumers and business. Retrieved from http://www.verizonbusiness.com/resources/whitepapers/wp_web-3-0-promise-and-implications_a4_en_xg.pdf

Optional Reading

Strickland, J. (2011). How Web 3.0 will work. HowStuffWorks. Retrieved from http://computer.howstuffworks.com/web-30.htm

Knowledge@Wharton. (2011, July 6). Web 3.0: The ‘Social Wave’ and how it disrupts the Internet. Managing Technology. Retrieved from http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article.cfm?articleid=2808

Rollyson, C. (2011, July 6). What kind of Web 3.0 world should we make? SocialMedia.biz. Retrieved, from http://www.socialmedia.biz/2011/07/06/what-kind-of-web-3-0-world-should-we-make/

Abhishek, N. (2012). Web 4.0 basics. The Customize Windows. Retrieved from http://thecustomizewindows.com/2011/09/web-4-0-basics/

Case Assignment

After reading the course materials, please answer the following questions.

“How will the Web 3.0 transformations be used in business? What are the benefits of W3.0 to consumers?”

Assignment Expectations

Your paper should be between 2-4 pages. Take a definite stand on the issues, and develop your supporting argument carefully. Using material from the background information and any other sources you can find to support specific points in your argument is highly recommended; try to avoid making assertions for which you can find no support other than your own opinion.

Be sure to provide proper citations for any material you reference from other sources! Please be guided by the TUI Guidelines cited in the background information for help in structuring and developing your paper.

You will be particularly assessed on:

Your ability to see what the module is all about and to structure your paper accordingly.

Your informed commentary and analysis — simply repeating what your sources say does not constitute an adequate paper.

Your ability to draw on a range of sources, and to establish your understanding of the historical context of the question.

Module 4 – SLP

WEB 3.0: THE SEMANTIC WEB AND BEYOND

The major breakthrough contributing to the development of Web 3.0 is semantic content for web pages and ontologies for querying. Semantic content will use semantic languages such as Resource Description Framework (RDF), Extensible Markup Language (XML), Web Ontology Language (WOL), and Extensible HTML (XHTML) to provide description for web documents. Ontologies are statements defined in semantic languages for computers to process knowledge in ways human process deductive reasoning and inference. Therefore, Web 3.0 would provide more meaningful searches and personalized results for the user. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C Semantic Web) heads a collaborative circle of developers, experts, and interest groups addressing web solutions and the Semantic Web in general.

The Semantic Web will factor more than the human element into searches. It will make searches more personalized and more comprehensive. For example, the field of law, Web 3.0 will change the way attorneys will research, produce, and present documents. Data on the Internet is essentially tagged, and it will be combined with information from various other sources to associate similarities to a case or research topic. In the medical field, Web 3.0 will improve collaboration for diagnostics and the adoption of best-of-breed practices for healthcare professionals all over the world. Medical content will be accessible through Internet repositories for adaptive data mining. In essence, research will be easier, all-inclusive, and better-rounded for the researcher.

Two of the goals of Web 3.0 are adaptability and the use of natural language to express complex queries. A new approach called “Responsive Web Design” (RWD) is becoming popular among website developers to enrich the navigation experience and to allow adaptive screen views for all types of mobile devices. In between now and the next five years, we will continue to build the next layer of intelligence through our individual contributions to the web. The following sites explain the Semantic Web application to medical endeavors and e-learning.

Jessen, W. (2012). Web 3.0 and predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine. Highlight Health. Retrieved from http://www.highlighthealth.com/healthcare/web-30-and-predictive-preventive-and-personalized-medicine/

Giannakos, M., & Lapatas, G. (2010). Towards Web 3.0: Concept for collaborative e-learning. Retrieved from http://ntnu-no.academia.edu/MichailGiannakos/Papers/396841/Towards_Web_3.0_Concept_for_Collaborative_E-Learning

SLP Assignment Overview

After reviewing the course materials, answer the following question in 2-3 pages.

“What have been the contributions of Web 3.0 to e-learning so far? How can we use the latest technologies to work for educational systems? Be creative in your answer.”

SLP Assignment Expectations

Your paper should be 2-3 pages in length, and reflect your personal experiences with the timeline. The important part of all these project assignments is to carefully assess your own experiences with the topic, and then reflect critically on what you might have learned about yourself and about situations through this assessment process.

The more that you can use the exercise to develop personal implications for your growth as a potential business person as well as an Internet-savvy individual, the more value you’ll get out of the exercise.

Module 5 – Case

MOBILE INTERNET

To study the evolution of mobile internet in this module, please review the following readings.

Required Reading

Shujaa Solution. (2010, December 10). Introduction to mobile Internet. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/shujaasolutions/introduction-to-mobile-internet

Raasch, J. (2010, November 3). How to build a mobile website. Smashing Magazine. Retrieved from http://mobile.smashingmagazine.com/2010/11/03/how-to-build-a-mobile-website/

Cisco. (2010). Evolution of the mobile network. Retrieved from http://www.cisco.com/en/US/solutions/collateral/ns341/ns973/white_paper_c11-624446.html

CrowdSauce. (2011, April 30). Future of Mobile Internet. [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvSdSyr4egI

Basulto, D. (2012, April 19). Mobile is so Money: The future of the Internet. Retrieved from http://bigthink.com/endless-innovation/mobile-is-so-money-the-future-of-the-internet

Optional Reading

Morgan Stanley. (2009, December 1). The mobile Internet report. Retrieved from http://mobile.knet.ca/node/34

WAP Forum Org. (2002, January 31). Wireless Application Protocol WAP 2.0. Retrieved from http://www.wapforum.org/what/WAPWhite_Paper1.pdf

Horton, C. (2012, July 19). Mobile Apps will drive the future of the Internet. Social Media Today. Retrieved from http://socialmediatoday.com/node/626061

When you’ve had a chance to review information from the background readings and research other sources on your own, please prepare a 2-4 page paper on the topic:

“Analyze the importance of mobile internet and Apps and their future”

Assignment Expectations

Your paper should be between 2-4 pages. Take a definite stand on the issues, and develop your supporting argument carefully. Using material from the background information and any other sources you can find to support specific points in your argument is highly recommended; try to avoid making assertions for which you can find no support other than your own opinion.

Be sure to provide proper citations for any material you reference from other sources! Please be guided by the TUI Guidelines cited in the background information for help in structuring and developing your paper.

You will be particularly assessed on:

Your ability to see what the module is all about and to structure your paper accordingly.

Your informed commentary and analysis — simply repeating what your sources say does not constitute an adequate paper.

Your ability to draw on a range of sources, and to establish your understanding of the historical context of the question

Module 5 – SLP

MOBILE INTERNET

Review Apple website for Mobile Apps: http://www.apple.com/osx/apps/app-store.html or any other website with mobile apps for Apple or Google.

Please prepare SLP paper on the topic

Review and discuss Mobile Apps for various smart devices and highlight one or two Mobile App you think will be very useful to you.

SLP Assignment Expectations

Your paper should be 2-3 pages in length, and reflect your personal experiences with this topic. The important part of all these project assignments is to carefully assess your own experiences with the topic, and then reflect critically on what you might have learned about yourself and about situations through this assessment process.

The more that you can use the exercise to develop personal implications for your growth as a potential business person as well as a knowledge user, the more value you’ll get out of the exercise.

Your paper will be evaluated on the following criteria:

Precision: You carried out the exercise as assigned, or carefully explained the limitations that might have prevented your completing some parts (running out of time isn’t generally considered an adequate limitation).

Clarity: Your answers are clear and show your good understanding of the topic.

Breadth and Depth: The scope covered in your paper is directly related to the questions of the assignment and the learning objectives of the module.

Critical thinking: The paper incorporates YOUR reactions, examples, and applications of the material to business that illustrate your reflective judgment and good understanding of the concepts.

Originally posted 2017-05-09 12:30:03. Republished by Blog Post Promoter